The costs of modernity

by CRTV

Left: Heather Tsui, right: interviewer Hong Tong Wu (Photographer: Tammy Chang (Cinemasia))

Left: Heather Tsui, right: interviewer Hong Tong Wu (Photographer: Tammy Chang (Cinemasia))

The current human endeavor for “progress” seems to wipe out diversity in languages and minorities. The film Long Time No Sea 只有大海知道 screened at Cinemasia Filmfestival tells the story of the Tao, the indigenous people living on the small Orchid Island of Taiwan. The Tao has lived on the Island for more than 800 years. There are only 3,000 Tao people left. How are the Tao tear apart between their traditional way of living and the demands of modern life? What will the world miss if the Tao disappears? Listen to CRTVs interview (Mandarin) with the maker of this film, Heather Tsui.

The making of a transgender film in Hong Kong

by CRTV

Left: filmdirector Jun Li, right: interviewer Hong Tong Wu (Photographer: Tammy Chang (CinemAsia))

Left: filmdirector Jun Li, right: interviewer Hong Tong Wu (Photographer: Tammy Chang (CinemAsia))

Hong Kong cinema is renowned for its martial arts films. The first feature film Tracey 翠絲 of director Jun Li, however, is a transgender film. What are his experiences in making a controversial film in Hong Kong? Listen to CRTV’s interview with Jun Li.

The future of food sculpting

by CRTV

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Food sculpting has a profound role in the history of Chinese cuisine. Recognised as an important art in its native land in The Netherlands a very different tale is sung. Once the crown jewel of every dish in Chinese restaurants, food sculptures are now slowly disappearing and the craft threatens to go extinct. Ami Tsang and Fay Teo made a short documentary at Cinemasia FilmLab about migrant food sculptors Chen Mo and Awan. Will there be a future for food sculptures in The Netherlands, where the economical Dutch consumer reign? Listen to CRTV’s interview with Ami and Fay.